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Home » CHFWeb Forum » HomeSchool » Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler?
icon5.gif  Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816190] Thu, 17 March 2016 08:16 Go to next message
Jamie
Messages: 4138
Registered: April 2005
Senior Member
Generally speaking, could you share with me the pros/cons of an umbrella school? I have not used one before, but have found a free one that looks as if it requires/demands very little. It appears to be just a place to be in compliance with the county/state where records are concerned (attendance/enrollment) with the remainder of what/how one homeschools up to the parent/guardian.

When homeschooling my other children, a number of years ago, we were only required to register with our county and file an annual evaluation. No attendance was necessary (and apparently still not unless one goes the umbrella school route).

Can you share with me the umbrella school pros/cons for the homeschooling family?


Peace
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816201 is a reply to message #816190 ] Sun, 20 March 2016 08:54 Go to previous messageGo to next message
janetR  is currently offline janetR
Messages: 1937
Registered: March 2010
Location: TX
Senior Member
We did an umbrella school only for our oldest for high school.

I think the pros and cons would depend on the school chosen. The advantages for us were the guidance given for high school classes, the transcripts kept, the school offered on-site once a week classes for some subjects, and the high school graduation ceremony. We went once per quarter to discuss our daughter's progress in all classes.

We did not use the school for the younger children because once we'd been all the way through high school and through the college admissions process, we did not feel that we needed the guidance any more. Also, it was quite a drive to the place where weekly classes and quarterly evaluations were held. It wasn't worth it any more to make the drive. The rest of the kids received home school diplomas.

For me, keeping attendance records would have been a definite disadvantage.

For a younger child, I would think the benefits would be similar: guidance for classes, records kept, maybe some co-op classes to attend or group field trip opportunities. If I were starting over like you, I also might like some legal advice or back-up.


JanetR
daughter of the King since 1980
wife to dh since 1981
mom to five of the most incredible adults on the planet, one wonderful 18yo, and grandma to two bouncy grandsons
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816426 is a reply to message #816190 ] Mon, 04 April 2016 18:22 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Jamie
Messages: 4138
Registered: April 2005
Senior Member
Let me refine my question after reading a complaint elsewhere on the net:


What are the longterm advantage/disadvantage for college seeking homeschoolers? (Do they gain/lose anything by having been in an umbrella school?)

This was not my focus when writing the original question, but I'm reading about at least one college turning down/away homeschool graduates because of their having been covered under an umbrella school.


Peace
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816430 is a reply to message #816190 ] Mon, 04 April 2016 21:06 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Cammie  is currently offline Cammie
Messages: 1861
Registered: April 2005
Location: Tennessee
Senior Member
Never heard of it being a disadvantage. In Tn you either homeschool under the local school board or an umbrella school. The umbrella schools keep your records, give you a transcript and state recognized diploma.


Cammie
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816449 is a reply to message #816430 ] Wed, 06 April 2016 00:25 Go to previous messageGo to next message
elliemaejune  is currently offline elliemaejune
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Cammie wrote on Mon, 04 April 2016 20:06

The umbrella schools keep your records, give you a transcript and state recognized diploma.


A small quibble: How is it a "state-recognized" diploma?


Born again since 1974
Married to Mr. Ellie for over 30 years
Mom to 2 amazing grown-up dds and 2 dsil
Grandmother to 1 beautiful baby boy

A kitten dies every time you use an apostrophe to pluralize.
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816453 is a reply to message #816190 ] Wed, 06 April 2016 09:14 Go to previous messageGo to next message
ReneeL.inMN
Messages: 4775
Registered: April 2005
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Quote:

What are the longterm advantage/disadvantage for college seeking homeschoolers? (Do they gain/lose anything by having been in an umbrella school?)



That's probably a college by college thing. My sons had no issues and we used North Atlantic Regional HighSchool for the oldest and nothing for the next one. They did community college and then private to finish up. The community college choice was strictly a financial and personal reason. Both had been accepted and courted by private colleges while in 'highschool'.

Dd is planning to actively pursue a Div. 1 or 2 college so I'm in the process of scoping out the best options for her. So far, I'm not finding an umbrella school is looked at favorably or unfavorably.

Personally, I liked the umbrella school for oldest only because we had never graduated a child before. I wouldn't do it again though.


ReneeL.inMN
25yos, 23yos, 13 yod I guess I am old enough for adult children.

My stomach hurts, but I still choose joy! :-)

Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816455 is a reply to message #816449 ] Wed, 06 April 2016 10:36 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Cammie  is currently offline Cammie
Messages: 1861
Registered: April 2005
Location: Tennessee
Senior Member
elliemaejune wrote on Tue, 05 April 2016 23:25

Cammie wrote on Mon, 04 April 2016 20:06

The umbrella schools keep your records, give you a transcript and state recognized diploma.


A small quibble: How is it a "state-recognized" diploma?


It is like a private school diploma. You are the teache , pick your own curiculum etc, but the umbrella school keeps records. This is the only other homeschool choice besides registering with the local school board, who then dictates classes, testing etc.

You pick an umbrella school based on your preference of a lot of ovesight or minimal (what we picked). There is no just homeschool and do as you toally please in the state of TN. So the umbrella school is registered with the state, a parent registers with umbrella school, umbrella school makes transcripts and sends you a diploma that the state of TN recognizes as legit. You can not issue your own transcript or diploma here and expect to attend a state college from what I understand. It was very restricting to me when we moved here from La, where they could have cared a less what I did.


Cammie
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816460 is a reply to message #816455 ] Wed, 06 April 2016 15:31 Go to previous messageGo to next message
elliemaejune  is currently offline elliemaejune
Messages: 1219
Registered: April 2005
Location: Texas
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Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 09:36

elliemaejune wrote on Tue, 05 April 2016 23:25

Cammie wrote on Mon, 04 April 2016 20:06

The umbrella schools keep your records, give you a transcript and state recognized diploma.


A small quibble: How is it a "state-recognized" diploma?


It is like a private school diploma. You are the teache , pick your own curiculum etc, but the umbrella school keeps records. This is the only other homeschool choice besides registering with the local school board, who then dictates classes, testing etc.

You pick an umbrella school based on your preference of a lot of oversight or minimal (what we picked). There is no just homeschool and do as you totally please in the state of TN. So the umbrella school is registered with the state, a parent registers with umbrella school, umbrella school makes transcripts and sends you a diploma that the state of TN recognizes as legit. You can not issue your own transcript or diploma here and expect to attend a state college from what I understand. It was very restricting to me when we moved here from La, where they could have cared a less what I did.



I understand how the umbrella school works; I owned/administered one for 16 years in California. Smile I was just quibbling over your saying that the diploma issued by the umbrella school is "recognized" by the state. That implies more government involvement or approval than is actually the case.

I don't know about TN state colleges, but most colleges in other states have no problems accepting parent-issued transcripts (most don't care about diplomas, but parent-issued diplomas are usually accepted, too).


Born again since 1974
Married to Mr. Ellie for over 30 years
Mom to 2 amazing grown-up dds and 2 dsil
Grandmother to 1 beautiful baby boy

A kitten dies every time you use an apostrophe to pluralize.
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816463 is a reply to message #816460 ] Wed, 06 April 2016 18:12 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Cammie  is currently offline Cammie
Messages: 1861
Registered: April 2005
Location: Tennessee
Senior Member
elliemaejune wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 14:31

Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 09:36

elliemaejune wrote on Tue, 05 April 2016 23:25

Cammie wrote on Mon, 04 April 2016 20:06

The umbrella schools keep your records, give you a transcript and state recognized diploma.


A small quibble: How is it a "state-recognized" diploma?


It is like a private school diploma. You are the teache , pick your own curiculum etc, but the umbrella school keeps records. This is the only other homeschool choice besides registering with the local school board, who then dictates classes, testing etc.

You pick an umbrella school based on your preference of a lot of oversight or minimal (what we picked). There is no just homeschool and do as you totally please in the state of TN. So the umbrella school is registered with the state, a parent registers with umbrella school, umbrella school makes transcripts and sends you a diploma that the state of TN recognizes as legit. You can not issue your own transcript or diploma here and expect to attend a state college from what I understand. It was very restricting to me when we moved here from La, where they could have cared a less what I did.



I understand how the umbrella school works; I owned/administered one for 16 years in California. Smile I was just quibbling over your saying that the diploma issued by the umbrella school is "recognized" by the state. That implies more government involvement or approval than is actually the case.

I don't know about TN state colleges, but most colleges in other states have no problems accepting parent-issued transcripts (most don't care about diplomas, but parent-issued diplomas are usually accepted, too).


Yes the state of TN is involved because the umbrella schools must be approved and registered. It is basically a private school done at home.


Cammie
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816465 is a reply to message #816463 ] Wed, 06 April 2016 20:35 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Karen in TN  is currently offline Karen in TN
Messages: 1649
Registered: April 2005
Location: TN
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Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 17:12

elliemaejune wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 14:31

Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 09:36

elliemaejune wrote on Tue, 05 April 2016 23:25

Cammie wrote on Mon, 04 April 2016 20:06

The umbrella schools keep your records, give you a transcript and state recognized diploma.


A small quibble: How is it a "state-recognized" diploma?


It is like a private school diploma. You are the teache , pick your own curiculum etc, but the umbrella school keeps records. This is the only other homeschool choice besides registering with the local school board, who then dictates classes, testing etc.

You pick an umbrella school based on your preference of a lot of oversight or minimal (what we picked). There is no just homeschool and do as you totally please in the state of TN. So the umbrella school is registered with the state, a parent registers with umbrella school, umbrella school makes transcripts and sends you a diploma that the state of TN recognizes as legit. You can not issue your own transcript or diploma here and expect to attend a state college from what I understand. It was very restricting to me when we moved here from La, where they could have cared a less what I did.



I understand how the umbrella school works; I owned/administered one for 16 years in California. Smile I was just quibbling over your saying that the diploma issued by the umbrella school is "recognized" by the state. That implies more government involvement or approval than is actually the case.

I don't know about TN state colleges, but most colleges in other states have no problems accepting parent-issued transcripts (most don't care about diplomas, but parent-issued diplomas are usually accepted, too).


Yes the state of TN is involved because the umbrella schools must be approved and registered. It is basically a private school done at home.




Right. In Tn if you are part of an umbrella you are technically considered a private schooler, not a homeschooler. It's weird.


wife of 31 years to Richard, Mom to Matthew (26), Adra 24, Shelby 15, Samuel 13, and Ruby Grace 11. Homeschooling for 19 years.
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816471 is a reply to message #816463 ] Thu, 07 April 2016 16:20 Go to previous messageGo to next message
elliemaejune  is currently offline elliemaejune
Messages: 1219
Registered: April 2005
Location: Texas
Senior Member
Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 17:12

elliemaejune wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 14:31

Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 09:36

elliemaejune wrote on Tue, 05 April 2016 23:25

Cammie wrote on Mon, 04 April 2016 20:06

The umbrella schools keep your records, give you a transcript and state recognized diploma.


A small quibble: How is it a "state-recognized" diploma?


It is like a private school diploma. You are the teache , pick your own curiculum etc, but the umbrella school keeps records. This is the only other homeschool choice besides registering with the local school board, who then dictates classes, testing etc.

You pick an umbrella school based on your preference of a lot of oversight or minimal (what we picked). There is no just homeschool and do as you totally please in the state of TN. So the umbrella school is registered with the state, a parent registers with umbrella school, umbrella school makes transcripts and sends you a diploma that the state of TN recognizes as legit. You can not issue your own transcript or diploma here and expect to attend a state college from what I understand. It was very restricting to me when we moved here from La, where they could have cared a less what I did.



I understand how the umbrella school works; I owned/administered one for 16 years in California. Smile I was just quibbling over your saying that the diploma issued by the umbrella school is "recognized" by the state. That implies more government involvement or approval than is actually the case.

I don't know about TN state colleges, but most colleges in other states have no problems accepting parent-issued transcripts (most don't care about diplomas, but parent-issued diplomas are usually accepted, too).


Yes the state of TN is involved because the umbrella schools must be approved and registered. It is basically a private school done at home.


Does the state actually *approve* the umbrella schools? Or do they just fill out any required paperwork or forms or whatever?


Born again since 1974
Married to Mr. Ellie for over 30 years
Mom to 2 amazing grown-up dds and 2 dsil
Grandmother to 1 beautiful baby boy

A kitten dies every time you use an apostrophe to pluralize.
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816472 is a reply to message #816465 ] Thu, 07 April 2016 16:23 Go to previous messageGo to next message
elliemaejune  is currently offline elliemaejune
Messages: 1219
Registered: April 2005
Location: Texas
Senior Member
[/quote]Right. In Tn if you are part of an umbrella you are technically considered a private schooler, not a homeschooler. It's weird.[/quote]

In California, Texas and Illinois, they are private schools, not homeschools, as well. All three states had court cases which decided that homeschoolers were actually small, unaccredited private schools. Razz


Born again since 1974
Married to Mr. Ellie for over 30 years
Mom to 2 amazing grown-up dds and 2 dsil
Grandmother to 1 beautiful baby boy

A kitten dies every time you use an apostrophe to pluralize.
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #816746 is a reply to message #816190 ] Mon, 02 May 2016 12:15 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Leigh  is currently offline Leigh
Messages: 4572
Registered: April 2005
Location: Tennessee
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Back when we were home schooling, the requirement allowed for umbrella schools, but required registering with the local superintendent.

I would always recommned joining HSLDA.

In our case, when it came time to complete Algebra 1, the district sent a letter saying we had to report to a local high school for end-of-course testing. There were a lot of phone calls and letters back and forth, but in the end, we did not submit to that. We were not using the same curriculum, and our daughter was not in high school technically. She was in 8th grade. I was not about to send her into a school she had never been to with students who could be four or five years older than she was.

It boiled down to a history and civics lesson. Requiring a child to take a course-specific test when she did not actually take that course was a violation of her Constitutional right to equal protection under the law. The lady I dealt with was new in the position, and she was a gracious as can be. It was just a complicated set of conversations.

We were not penalized in any way, but I was willing to be the Poster Mom if I needed to be. What I learned to do after that was make sure to put the specific title and author on the form we submitted to the superintendent. This made it very clear that while we might be doing Algebra 2, we were doing a different course than the local school system was doing.


Leigh
Tennessee

"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."

~~Benjamin Franklin

Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #817059 is a reply to message #816472 ] Sat, 04 June 2016 21:48 Go to previous messageGo to next message
janetR  is currently offline janetR
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"Unaccredited" is the key word.
If a student did a high school course at home, unaccredited usually means that if that student decides to transfer to a public high school, they will have to do the same course again with specific hours sitting in an accredited classroom with a certified teacher. (When my daughter went to public school in the 12th grade, she was taking senior AP classes, but all her records referred to her as a freshman.) Some private schools are accredited and some are not, but a private school's accreditation wouldn't extend to its umbrella school participants. I can't imagine that a home school family would ever go through an accreditation process, but maybe some have.

And it is interesting that in Texas, where home schools are very un-regulated, it is the law that colleges must not treat a home school diploma any differently than a public school diploma.

I would not have been happy home schooling in TN!


JanetR
daughter of the King since 1980
wife to dh since 1981
mom to five of the most incredible adults on the planet, one wonderful 18yo, and grandma to two bouncy grandsons
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #817066 is a reply to message #816190 ] Sun, 05 June 2016 08:42 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Karen in TN  is currently offline Karen in TN
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Our son did nothing but take the ACT and easily got into college in Tn with scholarships.

Karen in TN


wife of 31 years to Richard, Mom to Matthew (26), Adra 24, Shelby 15, Samuel 13, and Ruby Grace 11. Homeschooling for 19 years.
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #817141 is a reply to message #817059 ] Sat, 11 June 2016 23:47 Go to previous messageGo to next message
elliemaejune  is currently offline elliemaejune
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janetR wrote on Sat, 04 June 2016 20:48

"Unaccredited" is the key word.
If a student did a high school course at home, unaccredited usually means that if that student decides to transfer to a public high school, they will have to do the same course again with specific hours sitting in an accredited classroom with a certified teacher. (When my daughter went to public school in the 12th grade, she was taking senior AP classes, but all her records referred to her as a freshman.) Some private schools are accredited and some are not, but a private school's accreditation wouldn't extend to its umbrella school participants. I can't imagine that a home school family would ever go through an accreditation process, but maybe some have.

And it is interesting that in Texas, where home schools are very un-regulated, it is the law that colleges must not treat a home school diploma any differently than a public school diploma.

I would not have been happy home schooling in TN!


"Unaccredited" would make no difference in most states. Credits are either accepted or not.

And in California, a homeschooler enrolled in an accredited private school would still be enrolled in an accredited school (for clarity's sake, let me say that it would have to be a California-based private school, not something like ABeka Academy).


Born again since 1974
Married to Mr. Ellie for over 30 years
Mom to 2 amazing grown-up dds and 2 dsil
Grandmother to 1 beautiful baby boy

A kitten dies every time you use an apostrophe to pluralize.
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #817166 is a reply to message #816471 ] Mon, 13 June 2016 08:31 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Dimples  is currently offline Dimples
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elliemaejune wrote on Thu, 07 April 2016 15:20

Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 17:12

elliemaejune wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 14:31

Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 09:36

elliemaejune wrote on Tue, 05 April 2016 23:25

Cammie wrote on Mon, 04 April 2016 20:06

The umbrella schools keep your records, give you a transcript and state recognized diploma.


A small quibble: How is it a "state-recognized" diploma?


It is like a private school diploma. You are the teache , pick your own curiculum etc, but the umbrella school keeps records. This is the only other homeschool choice besides registering with the local school board, who then dictates classes, testing etc.

You pick an umbrella school based on your preference of a lot of oversight or minimal (what we picked). There is no just homeschool and do as you totally please in the state of TN. So the umbrella school is registered with the state, a parent registers with umbrella school, umbrella school makes transcripts and sends you a diploma that the state of TN recognizes as legit. You can not issue your own transcript or diploma here and expect to attend a state college from what I understand. It was very restricting to me when we moved here from La, where they could have cared a less what I did.



I understand how the umbrella school works; I owned/administered one for 16 years in California. Smile I was just quibbling over your saying that the diploma issued by the umbrella school is "recognized" by the state. That implies more government involvement or approval than is actually the case.

I don't know about TN state colleges, but most colleges in other states have no problems accepting parent-issued transcripts (most don't care about diplomas, but parent-issued diplomas are usually accepted, too).


Yes the state of TN is involved because the umbrella schools must be approved and registered. It is basically a private school done at home.


Does the state actually *approve* the umbrella schools? Or do they just fill out any required paperwork or forms or whatever?



In talking with one of the "umbrella school" superintendents this year, they are approved by the state for their accreditation and for a school to issue a state approved diploma they must be a certain type of school - class IV, class V, etc.

The interesting thing in TN is the "double standards" IMHO when it comes to receiving our state's scholarship for college(up to $5,000). A homeschool student must make a 21 or higher on the ACT; however, a public school student must make a 21 OR a 3.0 or higher GPA to receive the scholarship. GPA is not a consideration for a homeschool student, only the ACT score. We are struggling with this issue now as dd is not a good test taker AT ALL, has taken the ACT 3 times now and the highest she has be able to score is a 19.4. We are waiting for her last score to be sent to us. Hopefully, she will make a 21 and will receive the scholarship; otherwise, she will need to look for a job to help pay for college. Sad
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #817167 is a reply to message #817166 ] Mon, 13 June 2016 08:58 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Karen in TN  is currently offline Karen in TN
Messages: 1649
Registered: April 2005
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Dimples wrote on Mon, 13 June 2016 07:31

elliemaejune wrote on Thu, 07 April 2016 15:20

Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 17:12

elliemaejune wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 14:31

Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 09:36

elliemaejune wrote on Tue, 05 April 2016 23:25

Cammie wrote on Mon, 04 April 2016 20:06

The umbrella schools keep your records, give you a transcript and state recognized diploma.


A small quibble: How is it a "state-recognized" diploma?


It is like a private school diploma. You are the teache , pick your own curiculum etc, but the umbrella school keeps records. This is the only other homeschool choice besides registering with the local school board, who then dictates classes, testing etc.

You pick an umbrella school based on your preference of a lot of oversight or minimal (what we picked). There is no just homeschool and do as you totally please in the state of TN. So the umbrella school is registered with the state, a parent registers with umbrella school, umbrella school makes transcripts and sends you a diploma that the state of TN recognizes as legit. You can not issue your own transcript or diploma here and expect to attend a state college from what I understand. It was very restricting to me when we moved here from La, where they could have cared a less what I did.



I understand how the umbrella school works; I owned/administered one for 16 years in California. Smile I was just quibbling over your saying that the diploma issued by the umbrella school is "recognized" by the state. That implies more government involvement or approval than is actually the case.

I don't know about TN state colleges, but most colleges in other states have no problems accepting parent-issued transcripts (most don't care about diplomas, but parent-issued diplomas are usually accepted, too).


Yes the state of TN is involved because the umbrella schools must be approved and registered. It is basically a private school done at home.


Does the state actually *approve* the umbrella schools? Or do they just fill out any required paperwork or forms or whatever?



In talking with one of the "umbrella school" superintendents this year, they are approved by the state for their accreditation and for a school to issue a state approved diploma they must be a certain type of school - class IV, class V, etc.

The interesting thing in TN is the "double standards" IMHO when it comes to receiving our state's scholarship for college(up to $5,000). A homeschool student must make a 21 or higher on the ACT; however, a public school student must make a 21 OR a 3.0 or higher GPA to receive the scholarship. GPA is not a consideration for a homeschool student, only the ACT score. We are struggling with this issue now as dd is not a good test taker AT ALL, has taken the ACT 3 times now and the highest she has be able to score is a 19.4. We are waiting for her last score to be sent to us. Hopefully, she will make a 21 and will receive the scholarship; otherwise, she will need to look for a job to help pay for college. Sad



Stepping in gently here. I totally get your situation with test taking. I have a dd like this also. BUT . . . let's face it. Parents will lie so their child will get a scholarship if it is just a matter of reporting a grade for a GPA. We don't have to show any course work at all, we just put a grade on a piece of paper and send it in. The honor system, when $$$ is involved, doesn't always work. I understand why they need another standard for homeschool students. I would think a third option of a portfolio or something might be nice, but I understand why they require more than just a GPA.


wife of 31 years to Richard, Mom to Matthew (26), Adra 24, Shelby 15, Samuel 13, and Ruby Grace 11. Homeschooling for 19 years.
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #817179 is a reply to message #817167 ] Mon, 13 June 2016 14:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Cammie  is currently offline Cammie
Messages: 1861
Registered: April 2005
Location: Tennessee
Senior Member
Karen in TN wrote on Mon, 13 June 2016 07:58

Dimples wrote on Mon, 13 June 2016 07:31

elliemaejune wrote on Thu, 07 April 2016 15:20

Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 17:12

elliemaejune wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 14:31

Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 09:36

elliemaejune wrote on Tue, 05 April 2016 23:25

Cammie wrote on Mon, 04 April 2016 20:06

The umbrella schools keep your records, give you a transcript and state recognized diploma.


A small quibble: How is it a "state-recognized" diploma?


It is like a private school diploma. You are the teache , pick your own curiculum etc, but the umbrella school keeps records. This is the only other homeschool choice besides registering with the local school board, who then dictates classes, testing etc.

You pick an umbrella school based on your preference of a lot of oversight or minimal (what we picked). There is no just homeschool and do as you totally please in the state of TN. So the umbrella school is registered with the state, a parent registers with umbrella school, umbrella school makes transcripts and sends you a diploma that the state of TN recognizes as legit. You can not issue your own transcript or diploma here and expect to attend a state college from what I understand. It was very restricting to me when we moved here from La, where they could have cared a less what I did.



I understand how the umbrella school works; I owned/administered one for 16 years in California. Smile I was just quibbling over your saying that the diploma issued by the umbrella school is "recognized" by the state. That implies more government involvement or approval than is actually the case.

I don't know about TN state colleges, but most colleges in other states have no problems accepting parent-issued transcripts (most don't care about diplomas, but parent-issued diplomas are usually accepted, too).


Yes the state of TN is involved because the umbrella schools must be approved and registered. It is basically a private school done at home.


Does the state actually *approve* the umbrella schools? Or do they just fill out any required paperwork or forms or whatever?



In talking with one of the "umbrella school" superintendents this year, they are approved by the state for their accreditation and for a school to issue a state approved diploma they must be a certain type of school - class IV, class V, etc.

The interesting thing in TN is the "double standards" IMHO when it comes to receiving our state's scholarship for college(up to $5,000). A homeschool student must make a 21 or higher on the ACT; however, a public school student must make a 21 OR a 3.0 or higher GPA to receive the scholarship. GPA is not a consideration for a homeschool student, only the ACT score. We are struggling with this issue now as dd is not a good test taker AT ALL, has taken the ACT 3 times now and the highest she has be able to score is a 19.4. We are waiting for her last score to be sent to us. Hopefully, she will make a 21 and will receive the scholarship; otherwise, she will need to look for a job to help pay for college. Sad



Stepping in gently here. I totally get your situation with test taking. I have a dd like this also. BUT . . . let's face it. Parents will lie so their child will get a scholarship if it is just a matter of reporting a grade for a GPA. We don't have to show any course work at all, we just put a grade on a piece of paper and send it in. The honor system, when $$$ is involved, doesn't always work. I understand why they need another standard for homeschool students. I would think a third option of a portfolio or something might be nice, but I understand why they require more than just a GPA.



I agree a third indicator would be nice. Neither of my kids got the Hope scholarships because of ACT scores. Both have A averages in college. Standardized testing is not an indicator of future success. A portfolio would have been nice.


Cammie
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #817185 is a reply to message #817179 ] Mon, 13 June 2016 22:17 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Karen in TN  is currently offline Karen in TN
Messages: 1649
Registered: April 2005
Location: TN
Senior Member
Cammie wrote on Mon, 13 June 2016 13:53

Karen in TN wrote on Mon, 13 June 2016 07:58

Dimples wrote on Mon, 13 June 2016 07:31

elliemaejune wrote on Thu, 07 April 2016 15:20

Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 17:12

elliemaejune wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 14:31

Cammie wrote on Wed, 06 April 2016 09:36

elliemaejune wrote on Tue, 05 April 2016 23:25

Cammie wrote on Mon, 04 April 2016 20:06

The umbrella schools keep your records, give you a transcript and state recognized diploma.


A small quibble: How is it a "state-recognized" diploma?


It is like a private school diploma. You are the teache , pick your own curiculum etc, but the umbrella school keeps records. This is the only other homeschool choice besides registering with the local school board, who then dictates classes, testing etc.

You pick an umbrella school based on your preference of a lot of oversight or minimal (what we picked). There is no just homeschool and do as you totally please in the state of TN. So the umbrella school is registered with the state, a parent registers with umbrella school, umbrella school makes transcripts and sends you a diploma that the state of TN recognizes as legit. You can not issue your own transcript or diploma here and expect to attend a state college from what I understand. It was very restricting to me when we moved here from La, where they could have cared a less what I did.



I understand how the umbrella school works; I owned/administered one for 16 years in California. Smile I was just quibbling over your saying that the diploma issued by the umbrella school is "recognized" by the state. That implies more government involvement or approval than is actually the case.

I don't know about TN state colleges, but most colleges in other states have no problems accepting parent-issued transcripts (most don't care about diplomas, but parent-issued diplomas are usually accepted, too).


Yes the state of TN is involved because the umbrella schools must be approved and registered. It is basically a private school done at home.


Does the state actually *approve* the umbrella schools? Or do they just fill out any required paperwork or forms or whatever?



In talking with one of the "umbrella school" superintendents this year, they are approved by the state for their accreditation and for a school to issue a state approved diploma they must be a certain type of school - class IV, class V, etc.

The interesting thing in TN is the "double standards" IMHO when it comes to receiving our state's scholarship for college(up to $5,000). A homeschool student must make a 21 or higher on the ACT; however, a public school student must make a 21 OR a 3.0 or higher GPA to receive the scholarship. GPA is not a consideration for a homeschool student, only the ACT score. We are struggling with this issue now as dd is not a good test taker AT ALL, has taken the ACT 3 times now and the highest she has be able to score is a 19.4. We are waiting for her last score to be sent to us. Hopefully, she will make a 21 and will receive the scholarship; otherwise, she will need to look for a job to help pay for college. Sad



Stepping in gently here. I totally get your situation with test taking. I have a dd like this also. BUT . . . let's face it. Parents will lie so their child will get a scholarship if it is just a matter of reporting a grade for a GPA. We don't have to show any course work at all, we just put a grade on a piece of paper and send it in. The honor system, when $$$ is involved, doesn't always work. I understand why they need another standard for homeschool students. I would think a third option of a portfolio or something might be nice, but I understand why they require more than just a GPA.



I agree a third indicator would be nice. Neither of my kids got the Hope scholarships because of ACT scores. Both have A averages in college. Standardized testing is not an indicator of future success. A portfolio would have been nice.


I've thought that the first year should be free and then scholarships are given to the kids with good grades AFTER their first year of college. Or maybe even pay for the first year and then if you have a good GPA they would pay going forward or back pay. Our son having the HOPE was a deal changer for us.

Karen in TN


wife of 31 years to Richard, Mom to Matthew (26), Adra 24, Shelby 15, Samuel 13, and Ruby Grace 11. Homeschooling for 19 years.
Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #817189 is a reply to message #817185 ] Tue, 14 June 2016 08:00 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Dimples  is currently offline Dimples
Messages: 1406
Registered: August 2005
Senior Member
This is our third and last child to graduate in TN. Our ds was one of the first recipients of the HOPE and lost it because of his GPA in college - he just didn't go to class, etc. Evil or Very Mad Our oldest dd received the scholarship and excelled in college, using the HOPE to get her AA at a local community college and is still going to school for her Psychology degree. Very Happy

Our youngest dd graduated this year - a year early. She is very determined, mind set on her goal (Neonatal Nurse) and is "ready to conquer the world." Laughing As I said earlier, she struggles with tests like the ACT. She struggled with the TCAP when she was in public school. After taking the ACT the first time, she began using Chegg's ACT Prep course, taking practice tests weekly, reading through her ACT Prep book, etc. She has been frustrated because she has the GPA, but struggles to make the score. She knows a kid (public school) that just shrugs his shoulders and says that he doesn't have to even take the ACT, he has it made with his GPA. She is a 'defender of equality and wants justice for all.' LOL Laughing

There should be a third indicator for homeschool students - maybe make the GPA requirement higher for homeschool - I'm not sure. I understand that some may take advantage of the requirements and 'skew' grades to receive the Hope. However, if you are under an umbrella school, especially the one we used, they make sure that the curriculum you are using meets the proper requirements and/or will question the grades your child receives. We have kept all of the high school paperwork and grades for our kids (probably still in the attic) in case their diploma, grades were/are questioned by a college. I realize that probably will never happen, but there is nothing worse than getting rid of something and finding out later you need what you threw away.

Re: Umbrella Schools: pros/cons for the homeschooler? [message #817259 is a reply to message #816453 ] Sat, 18 June 2016 10:00 Go to previous message
Sherry in NH  is currently offline Sherry in NH
Messages: 9593
Registered: April 2005
Location: Small Town New Hampshire
Senior Member
Uh....for Div 1/Div 2...are you aware that it is the hsing parents responsibility to get the student ncaa qualified...they are quite picky and I did not know until almost too late...


In Jesus

Sherry from NH
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